HELLAS ESSENTIALIZED

HELLAS ESSENTIALIZED: ANTIQUITY, THE GR€€K CRISIS,

AND POLITICAL CARTOONS IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE

“Wars, greed, corruption, political shenanigans, terrorism, infighting and intrigue. Should be a great year for us.” (quoted by Martyn Turner in his book The Noble Art of Politics, 1996)

 

Given the current state of world affairs, political cartoonists—practitioners of the so-called “art of ill will”—must surely find their plates brimming with possibilities, not least with the offerings served up by the recent Greek crisis. Indeed, the current economic woes in Greece have created a perfect menu for political cartoonists: the reach of the disaster is global, the country provides well-known, easily recognized images that encapsulate its national identity, and the world eagerly seeks to assign blame for the economic mess.

As an archaeologist who works in Greece, I found myself wondering whether classically derived images were repeatedly being chosen to satirize the current situation and, if so, how Greek identity was crystallized in those single-frame narratives. After all, the study and interrogation of Greek identity has often focused on the modern deployment of Greece’s antiquity; archaeological remains and ancient mythological images are omnipresent in modern Greece, comprising a major part of its symbolic and cultural capital…          Please continue reading here…. http://www.lsa.umich.edu/UMICH/modgreek/Home/Window%20to%20Greek%20Culture/Lectures%20at%20U-M/LaUM_TalalayEyesonEuropeBlog1.pdf

 

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About Lauren Talalay

I am the Associate Director and Curator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan. My research focuses on the Neolithic of Greece, figurines, and the early use of the body as a symbol.
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